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Does Exercise Help You Eat Healthier

It is believed that people who exercise on a regular basis also start to eat better and as a result their brain may change, according to research undertaken in the U.S. This may seem like a fairly straightforward statement, but research is needed to gain a fuller understanding of the topic area.

According to Miguel Alonso, a researcher at Harvard University in Boston, has said data from epidemiological studies, suggest tendencies toward a healthy diet and the right amount of physical exercise often come hand in hand. This and an increase in physical activity are usually linked to a corresponding improvement in diet quality.

“Understanding the interaction between exercise and a healthy diet could improve preventative and therapeutic measures against obesity by strengthening present approaches and treatments,” Alonso said in a statement.

“Physical exercise seems to encourage a healthy diet. In fact, when exercise is added to a weight-loss diet, treatment of obesity is more successful and the diet is adhered to in the long run.”

Several previous studies which have measured changes in the brain and cognitive functions in relation to exercise, have found regular physical exercise to cause changes in the general working and structure of the brain,  Alonso also said.

Alonso supports the notion that “regular exercise improves output in tests that measure the state of the brain’s executive functions and increases the amount of grey matter and prefrontal connections.” In other words it increases brain activity and stimulation.

Inhibitory control is one of the executive functions of the brain and is basically the ability to suppress inadequate and non-conforming answers to an aim, the review published in Obesity Reviews said.

With regard to losing weight and sustaining weight loss in the long run, various recent studies suggest executive functions such as inhibitory control and optimal functioning of the brain’s prefrontal areas could be the key to success, Alonso has said.

This is interesting research in the battle against weight problems and indeed obesity and more studies like this will highlight the importance of the ‘cause and effect’ relationship between regular exercise and healthy eating. As mentioned this may help with certain preventive measures and it seems the getting more exercise will contribute significantly to a healthier diet and eating habits.

Sourced From

http://m.upi.com/m/story/UPI-58071322284055/